Wall Street bailout: Not enough, and, without equity, too much of a giveaway?

September 25, 2008 at 3:57 am | Posted in credit, Housing, regulations | Leave a comment
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Bush appeals to Americans to support the $700 billion rescue effort.

I’m afraid, though, that this rescue will not be last of it. As I have examined elsewhere, a 25% drop in prices, which is not improbable, would leave home values $1.8 trillion below mortgage debt. The finance sector is undercapitalized, and is in no position to absorb these losses, or the losses on the derivative positions on these mortgages.

In any case, I oppose overpaying for mortgage assets without the government taking equity stakes in the businesses it rescues. That way, some of the overpayment may eventually be recovered. If it isn’t, at least the taxpayer won’t be worse off. Equity is basically the call option on the underlying health of the economy and financial system – If, as the government insists, the fundamentals are better than current panic conditions suggest (but bad, nonetheless), there is no reason why the government would not want equity as a call option on the bet that they are right.

Unless the rescue includes a workout to keep people in homes (I’ve explored this idea here), home values will keep falling, and the inventory of unsold and bank-owned homes will continue to rise. Not that this wouldn’t happen with a owner-to-tenant transition, but the price trough and the inventory peak may be muted somewhat by taking the urgency out of the foreclosure sale.

One likely consequence could be rental prices would fall as well, hurting landlords, but benefiting tenants, saving them money which they can use elsewhere. Which might be a good thing for broad sections of the economy.

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